Jody L Jensen

Jody L Jensen

Professor


Exercise Science

Email
JLJensen@austin.utexas.edu

Office & Hours

Office: BEL 546K
Monday: 1:00 - 2:30 p
and by appt

Phone
(512) 232-2685

Fax
(512) 471-8914

Web
View Website

Courses of Instruction
KIN 321m Motor Development and Performance
KIN 3327L Fieldwork in Kinesiology
KIN 334 Children's Exercise and Physical Activity
KIN 338 Motor Development and Assessment
KIN 382 Biomechanics Laboratory Techniques
KIN 395 Children's Exercise and Physical Activity
KIN 395 Motor Development and Assessment

Mailing Address
2109 San Jacinto Blvd D3700
Department of Kinesiology and Health Education
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas 78712-1415
UT Mail Code: D3700

Full Vita
download vita (pdf)

Profile

Dr. Jensen is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology & Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Additionally, she holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Psychology and is a member of the Institute of Neuroscience. Dr. Jensen’s research interests are in developmental motor control. With training in both motor development and biomechanics, her research has focused on the contributions of mechanics to skill acquisition and changes in motor competence across the lifespan. In her early work, the tasks of posture and locomotion served as the laboratory for understanding age-related changes in the exploitation of non-muscular forces.  This work has evolved into the evaluation of strategies for rehabilitation of lower extremity function. A current collaboration between Dr. Jensen's lab and Dell Children's Medical Center is focused on the development of a computer model of the legs to be used in guiding treatment for children with cerebral palsy. In a second line of research, Dr. Jensen is exploring the connection between movement experience and cognition. This work is targeted at understanding learning through physical activity in children with autism spectrum disorders.  Dr. Jensen is the co-founder The Autism Project (TAP) at the University of Texas.

Education

1989 Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, MD -- Biomechanics.

Representative Publications

Liu, T., & Jensen, J.L. (2012). Age-related differences: Bilateral asymmetry in cycling performance. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 83(1), 114

Jensen, J.L., & Van Zandwijk, R. (2011). Biomechanical aspects of the development of postural control. In De Ste Croix, M. and T. Korff (Eds). Paediatric Biomechanics and Motor Control: Theory and Application. Routledge Publishers (New York).

Liu, T., & Jensen, J. L. (2011). Effects of strategy use on children’s motor performance in a continuous timing task. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 82(2), 198-209.

Jensen, J.L., & Van Zandwijk, R. (2011). Biomechanical aspects of the development of postural control. In De Ste Croix, M. and T. Korff (Eds). Paediatric Biomechanics and Motor Control: Theory and Application. Routledge Publishers (New York).

Liu, T., & Jensen, J. L. (2011). Effects of strategy use on children’s motor performance in a continuous timing task. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 82(2), 198-209.

Korff, T., & Jensen, J.L. (2008). Effect of relative changes in anthropometry during childhood on muscular power production in pedaling: a biomechanical simulation. Pediatric Exercise Science, 20(3), 292-304

Korff, T., & Jensen, J.L. (2007). Age-related differences in adaptation during childhood: the influences of muscular power production and segmental energy flow caused by muscles. Experimental Brain Research, 177, 291-303.

Korff, T., & Jensen, J.L. (2007). Age-related differences in adaptation during childhood: the influences of muscular power production and segmental energy flow caused by muscles. Experimental Brain Research, 177, 291-303.

Brown, N.A.T., & Jensen, J.L. (2006). The role of segmental mass and moment of inertia in dynamic-contact task construction. Journal of Motor Behavior, 38, 313-326.

Jensen, J.L. (2005). The puzzles of motor development: How the study of developmental biomechanics contributes to the puzzle solutions. Infant and Child Development, 14, 501-511.

Brown, N.A.T., & Jensen, J.L. (2006). The role of segmental mass and moment of inertia in dynamic-contact task construction. Journal of Motor Behavior, 38, 313-326.

Jensen, J.L. (2005). The puzzles of motor development: How the study of developmental biomechanics contributes to the puzzle solutions. Infant and Child Development, 14, 501-511.

Recent Awards

  • 2011    National Academy of Kinesiology, Fellow #507
  • 2008    Ruth B. Glassow Biomechanics Honor Award, National Association for Sport and Physical Education
  • 2005   Outstanding Faculty Volunteer, University of Texas at Austin
  • 2000   Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Visiting Scholar, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
  • 1995   Early Career Distinguished Scholar Award. Awarded by the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity

Current Research Projects and Grants

$401,000 National Science Foundation, 2000-2004

$31,850 American Federation for Aging Research, 1995-1996

$611,732 National Institute of Aging, 1995 ­ 2000 (M.Woollacott, PI, J.L. Jensen & A. Shumway-Cook, co-investigators)

$130,563 National Science Foundation, 1996-1999 (M. Woollacott & J. L. Jensen, Co-PIs)

$16,989 Oregon Medical Research Foundation, 1991-1992

Research Interests and Expertise

Lower-extremity neuro-motor control in clinical populations

Gait and posture in typically and atypically-developing populations

Autism - mediation of symptoms and function through physical activity

Boards, Committees and Associations

  • Past-President (Term of office: 2011-2012) North American Society for Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
  • President (Term of office: 2010-2011)  North American Society for Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
  • President-Elect (Term of office: 2009-2010)  North American Society for Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
  • Texas Autism Research and Resource Consortium