Stephanie Cawthon

Stephanie Cawthon

Associate Professor


Human Development, Culture, and Learning Sciences (HDCLS)

Email
stephanie.cawthon@austin.utexas.edu

Office & Hours

Office: SZB 506K
By appointment on any day

Phone
(512) 471-0378

Fax
(512) 471-1288

Web
View Website

Courses of Instruction
Educational Disabilities in the Schools
History and Systems of Psychology
Adolescent Development

Mailing Address
The University of Texas at Austin
Educational Psychology
1912 Speedway, Stop D5800
Austin, TX 78712-1289

Full Vita
download vita (pdf)

Profile

Dr. Stephanie Cawthon investigates issues of equity and access in education from multiple vantage points. Dr. Cawthon is a national expert on issues related to standardized assessment and students who are deaf or hard of hearing, particularly in the context of accountability reforms such as No Child Left Behind. She is the Associate Director for Research and Evidence Synthesis at pepnet2, a Technical Assistance and Dissemination project that serves individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Dr. Cawthon explores assessment issues such as the effects of accommodations or item modifications on test scores for students with disabilities and English Language Learners. She is a part of an interdisciplinary team of researchers and practitioners looking at the potential of drama-based instruction for students from diverse backgrounds. This project focuses targeting teacher's pedagogical knowledge through innovative, kinesthetic, and collaborative teaching strategies. View our videos and work in schools

Education

B. A., Psychology, Stanford University, 1994

M. A., Social Psychology, Stanford University, 1995

Ph. D., Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2002

Representative Publications

Cawthon, S. Caemmerer, J., Dickson, D., Ocuto, O., Ge, J., Bond, M. (in press, 2014). Social skills as predictors of postsecondary outcomes for schools of the deaf. Applied Developmental Science.

Cawthon, S., Caemmerer, J., and the RES team (in press, 2014). Parent expectations and transition outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. American Annals of the Deaf.

Cawthon, S., Garberoglio, C. L. , Caemmerer, J., Bond, M., & Wendel, E. (in press, 2014). Effects of parent expectations and parent involvement on postschool outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Exceptionality

Sligar, S., Cawthon, S., Morere, D., & Moxley, A. (in press, 2014) Test equity considerations for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Journal of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association.

Walsh, E., & Cawthon, S. (2014). The mediating role of depressive symptoms in the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and smoking. Addictive Behaviors. 39, pp. 1471-1476.

Recent Awards

Faculty Research Award. (One semester’s salary). College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin. 2015-2016

Fellow in the Elizabeth Glenadine Gibb Teaching Fellowship in Education, UT Austin. 2014-2015

Fellow, Joe R. & Teresa Lozano Long Endowed Faculty Fellows Fund, UT Austin. 2013-2014

Current Research Projects and Grants

Hartland Charter School Literacy Partnership, Co-Principal Investigator. ($20,000). Hartland Fine Arts Leadership Academy contract with Drama for Schools. 2014-2016

PEPNet 2 (Center proposal formerly titled “Center for Results in Education and Employment for Deaf Students: Research and Collaboration for System Change”). Office of Special Education Programs, US DOE. Associate Director for Research and Evidence Synthesis. 2011-2016

Research Interests and Expertise

Dr. Cawthon's research focuses on access and equity in education. Her interests lie in the areas of instruction, assessment, and policy issues that affect those students who have been traditionally underserved. More specifically, Dr. Cawthon has an expertise in assessment accommodations, test development, and assessment policy related to standards-based and accountability reforms. Dr. Cawthon utilizes mixed methods approach to research, including secondary analysis of large-scale datasets, quasi-experimental design, arts-based methods, and qualitative designs.