Greetings, Chautauqua Participants!

Our Chautauqua short courses must be self-supporting. Because funding is no longer received from the National Science Foundation or other institution, each short course will require a $100 registration fee and an additional course fee to help cover costs.

We hope that you will consider these excellent learning opportunities. Please help us spread the word about these courses and share this information with friends or colleagues who may be interested.

NOTE: An individual may participate in more than one short course. Also high school teachers and retired faculty, as well as adult companions, are welcome in these courses.

Please contact us if you have questions.  Thank you!

 

 

 

 

2015 Chautauqua Short Course Program 


Sponsored by

Center for STEM Education

The University of Texas at Austin

James P. Barufaldi, Ph.D., Director

Center for STEM Education

E-mail: jamesb@austin.utexas.edu

 

Additional information contact:

Gail Seale, Coordinator

Phone: 512-232-6202

Email: gails@austin.utexas.edu

 

We encourage early registration so we may confirm that a course as “made,” as soon as possible. Early registration enables participants to purchase less expensive airline tickets and request travel support from their institutions.

To reserve your space, a $100 registration fee must be sent in advance to Dr. James P. Barufaldi, Center for STEM Education, 1912 Speedway #340 (D5500), UT Austin, Austin, TX 78712. In the event a course does not make, the registration and course fees are refunded or may be transferred to another course (IF cancellation is at least one month prior to course date).

 

Proceeds may be used in general support of the

College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin

 

 

 

IRELAND’S ANCIENT PAST –

MEGALITHS AND NEOLITHIC TOMBS

DR. ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center

Date:  June 4-11, 2015

Note:         Participants will be responsible for arranging their own transportation to and from Dublin (about $1000 from the USA).  An additional course fee to cover in-country costs for lodging, ground transportation by bus and train, breakfasts, and entry fees - amount of $1900 - must be paid by each participant. Meals during the week and other incidentals will cost an additional estimated $350 per person.

 

Most accounts of Ireland’s ancient past begin with the Celtic cultures encountered by Roman historians in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD.  However, there’s a much more ancient past of Ireland – one during which megalithic monuments were erected a thousand years before the pyramids of Egypt. This one-week travel course will explore Neolithic Ireland, visiting the very oldest megaliths and tombs in the country.  Participants will ponder how these monuments were created, and for what purpose. Beginning and ending in Dublin, participants will travel to the passage tombs of Bru na Bóinne, Loughcrew, the Carrowmore cemetery, Ceide Fields, and end up in the far north to join a pilgrimage through neolithic cairn sites in honor of St. Colmcille.

Participants will fly into Dublin and gather the first night for an orientation meeting.  The next day will be spent in Dublin, visiting the National Archaeology Museum and attending a lecture on Ireland’s Neolithic Period. Day three will bring the group to the Boyne valley first to explore the 5000 year old passage tombs of Newgrange and Knowth, considered the oldest astronomically structures in the world, and then the Hill of Tara, seat of Ireland’s ancient high kings.  Travelling to the east, an even older passage tomb at Loughcrew will be explored, followed by a stop at Gaelic Queen Medb’s capital at Rothcroghan, before landing in the city of Sligo for the evening.  From Sligo participants will visit Carrowmore cemetery, containing over 60 megalithic tombs from 3500 BC and Ceide Fields, an amazing Neolithic farming community preserved under a peat bog. 

June 9th is the cornerstone of the travel course.  On that morning the group will travel to the remote village of Glencolmcille to participate in a 5km pilgrimage in honor of Ireland’s beloved St. Colmcille.  Though a devotedly Christian pilgrimage, its route stops at various neolithic cairn sites to leave offerings and make prayers to protect the world from evil.  On the way back to Dublin, the course will spend a final day back in the beautiful Boyne Valley, this time to explore Slane Castle and visit the Hill of Slane - the famous spot where St. Patrick lit his fire at Easter before converting the Irish high kings at the Hill of Tara to Christianity.  The group will return to Dublin that evening for a final dinner together and course closing ceremonies.

   

For people with an interest in: history, archaeology, anthropology, art, astronomy, mythology, sociology, philosophy and other related social sciences fields.

Prerequisites: While not required, participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of the history of ancient Ireland.  Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip.  Day trips will involve hiking around in brisk weather.  The pilgrimage at Glencolmcille will last about 3 hours and cover 5km. While it will not be physically challenging, participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

 

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last 25 years as an archaeologist, an explorer and an instructor.  During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973) he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque.  He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. In 2013 his 24-lecture Great Courses series entitled “Lost Worlds of South America” was released and has been very well received.  He is currently investigating archaeoastronomy and ancient geometry in the ruins of Central America, South America, and Southeast Asia.  Visit www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

 

 

ANCIENT CULTURE AND MODERN ECOLOGY IN BOLIVIA –

TIWANAKU, LAKE TITICACA, THE ISLAND OF THE SUN, AND THE SALAR DE UYUNI

DR. ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center

Date:  June 19-26, 2015

Note:         Participants will be responsible for arranging their own transportation to and from La Paz, Bolivia.  An additional course fee to cover in-country costs for lodging, ground transportation by bus and train, breakfasts, and entry fees - estimated at $1800 - will be paid by each participant. Meals during the week and other incidentals will cost an estimated $250.  A Bolivian tourist visa will be required before travel, currently $165 and obtained from the Bolivian Embassy.

 

This one-week travel course will explore the altiplanos of Bolivia and focus on its ancient ruins and modern ecology.  Beginning and ending in La Paz, participants will travel to Tiwanaku, Lake Titicaca, and the Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flats.

Participants will fly into La Paz and gather the first night for an orientation meeting.  The next day, June 20, they will travel to the archaeological site of Tiwanaku to explore its ruins and the associated site of Puma Punku. At dawn the next day the local Amara people celebrate Inti Raymi, a winter solstice festival, in the ruins.  The group will be there at sunrise to observe and participate in the festivities.  That afternoon the course will travel north to the shores of Lake Titicaca and the town of Copacabana to visit the Church of the Black Virgin and witness the bizarre blessing of vehicles in front of the church.  A boat ride the next day will bring them to the Island of the Sun, the place where Inca mythology says the creator deity Viracocha called forth the Sun and the Moon.  The group will return to La Paz that evening.

June 24th will be a full travel day, starting with a three hour bus drive to the highlands town of Oruro and continuing from there seven more hours by train to the tiny town of Uyuni.  The train has premier class seating, meals, and spectacular views of Lake Poopo along the way.  Uyuni sits at the edge of the Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flats.  The next two days will be spent exploring the unworldly landscape of the salt flat, learning about its unique properties (like its immense lithium resources), and staying in a hotel made entirely of salt.  A Friday afternoon flight from Uyuni back to La Paz will bring the course to a close, getting participants back in time for the late evening flights back to the USA.

   

For people with an interest in: botany, biology, ecology, chemistry, environmental studies, archaeology, anthropology, art, history, art history, sociology, philosophy and other related social sciences fields.

Prerequisites: While not required, participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of the history of ancient Bolivia.  Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip.  Day trips will involve hiking around in cold, high altitude environments.  In fact, most of the week will be spent above 12,000 ft asl, so altitude sickness medicines are recommended and people with a history of migraines or blood pressure trouble should consult their physicians before joining the course. While it will not be physically challenging, participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last 25 years as an archaeologist, an explorer and an instructor.  During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973) he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque.  He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. In 2013 his 24-lecture Great Courses series entitled “Lost Worlds of South America” was released and has been very well received.  He is currently investigating archaeoastronomy and ancient geometry in the ruins of Central America, South America, and Southeast Asia.  Visit www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

 
Last updated on November 6, 2014


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